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Weimar Cinema 1919-1933

Sounds of Weimar Cinema

9 June

A day of talks, film and music from the BFI and the Philharmonia Orchestra.

Joint day tickets from £35: philharmonia.co.uk/weimar_berlin

Image from Sounds of Weimar Cinema

At BFI Southbank

At Royal Festival Hall

Free performance

The Brazen Roar
17:00

Hear the world premiere of The Brazen Roar, composed by Siobhan Lamb and commissioned by Hounslow Music Service to celebrate Kempton Steam Museum. The piece explores man’s relationship with power, choices and change, using verses from an epic poem by 18th-century doctor and thinker Erasmus Darwin.

Young musicians from Hounslow Music Service, Hounslow Youth Choir and a school choir are joined by players from the Philharmonia Orchestra, and trumpet soloist Gerard Presencer. The Brazen Roar is accompanied by an animated film, created by pupils from Bolder Academy, supported by Chocolate Films. The Brazen Roar has been made possible thanks to grants from Arts Council England, London Music Fund and the Danish Composers Guild.

Insights talk

Introducing the Weimar Series
18:00

Gavin Plumley talks to writer and broadcaster Philipp Blom, author of Fracture: Life and Culture in the West 1918-1938, about the Weimar Republic and its enduring echoes.

Concert

The Sounds of Change
19:30

A snapshot of Germany in the 1920s, in a programme that draws from three hugely successful theatrical works. Shostakovich visited Berlin from the Soviet Union in 1927 and set his ballet The Golden Age in the Weimar Republic. Shostakovich met both Hindemith and Weill during his Berlin trip and declared that Hindemith was his favourite contemporary composer. Hindemith’s virtuosic, muscular Concerto for Orchestra is juxtaposed here with an orchestral suite from Weill’s Threepenny Opera, best known for the song ‘Mack the Knife’. Back in Russia, Shostakovich attended the first Soviet performance of Alban Berg’s opera Wozzeck, and fondly greeted its composer, who had become an international star following the 1925 premiere in Berlin.


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