May

A Question of Faith

This month, as last, our daily screenings of classic films deal with questions of faith... and, inevitably, doubt, since they often co-exist in uneasy symbiosis. In April we focused on Christianity; now we turn to a survey of faith – and doubt – in other aspects of life, exploring how we deal with loved ones, families, sickness and suffering, and the prospect of inexorable mortality.

Geoff Andrew, Programmer-at-large

 

Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans

FW Murnau’s visually striking silent classic, about a marriage turned toxic by temptation.

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Daughters of the Dust

A highly original, imaginative, time-bending fable about tradition and modernity, culture and conflict.

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The Long Day Closes

Terence Davies’ largely autobiographical account of a teenager’s experiences in mid-50s Liverpool.

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Journey to Italy

Rossellini’s classic examination of a marriage on the rocks features a perfectly cast Ingrid Bergman and George Sanders.

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The Umbrellas of Cherbourg

A heartrending all-sung musical about young lovers pulled apart by parental ambition and war.

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The Miracle Worker

The story of the young deaf and blind Helen Keller and the governess who fought to diminish her sense of isolation.

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June

After Bresson...

Surprisingly (since he never made mainstream hits), Robert Bresson has influenced a great many filmmakers, especially (but not exclusively) those regarded as ‘arthouse’. This month’s daily screenings of classic movies offer a small, diverse selection of works – some obviously Bressonian, others less so – which echo his oeuvre stylistically and/or thematically. No Akerman, Jia or Kaurismäki? We could have included so many more.

Geoff Andrew, Programmer-at-large

 

Ivan’s Childhood

Tarkovsky’s first feature, about a Soviet teenager engaged in spying on the German front in WWII, is also one of his finest.

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The Merchant of Four Seasons

One of Fassbinder’s most moving achievements, charting the decline of a fruit seller virtually ignored by those around him.

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The Merchant of Four Seasons + intro by Travis Miles, freelance film writer

One of Fassbinder’s most moving achievements, charting the decline of a fruit seller virtually ignored by those around him.

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The Goalkeeper’s Fear of the Penalty

Wim Wenders’ early gem about a footballer who suddenly leaves a match in Vienna, and changes his life forever.

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The Spirit of the Beehive

A dazzling cinematic jewel about a family living in Franco’s Spain, and the daughter’s fateful first encounter with the movies.

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Taxi Driver

Scorsese, Schrader and De Niro firing on all cylinders with a Pickpocket-inspired study of a troubled loner.

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Escape from Alcatraz

Clint Eastwood is impressively understated in Siegel’s prison movie, inspired by a real-life escape attempt.

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Thief

Michael Mann’s virtuoso crime movie stars James Caan, at his best, as a safecracker taking on one last job.

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Down By Law

Jim Jarmusch’s visually stunning comedy-fable mixes film noir, jailbreak movie, and poetic parable.

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71 Fragments of a Chronology of Chance

This remarkable contemplation of chance charts 71 seemingly inconsequential moments leading to an event of great consequence.

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71 Fragments of a Chronology of Chance + intro by Geoff Andrew, Programmer-at-Large

This remarkable contemplation of chance charts 71 seemingly inconsequential moments leading to an event of great consequence.

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Rosetta

The Dardenne brothers’ groundbreaking, influential study of an impoverished teen struggling to keep her job.

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Rosetta + intro

The Dardenne brothers’ groundbreaking, influential study of an impoverished teen struggling to keep her job.

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Stranger by the Lake

An imaginative and explicit gay parable about the strange encounters made by a man frequenting a cruising beach.

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Certain Women

Kelly Reichardt’s triptych of stories about four women trying to get by in rural America is pleasingly low-key and beautifully acted.

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Certain Women + intro by BFI Director of Public Programme and Audiences, Jason Wood

Kelly Reichardt’s triptych of stories about four women trying to get by in rural America is pleasingly low-key and beautifully acted.

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